Rose Byrne in Talks to Join Jamie Foxx, Cameron Diaz and Quvenzhane Wallis in Movie Remake of Annie

first_img Get a sense of Byrne’s vocal chops in the short clip below. Related Shows Byrne’s is best known for her two-time Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated work as Ellen Parsons on the acclaimed series Damages. Her vast film credits include The Internship, Insidious, X-Men: First Class, 28 Weeks Later, Marie Antoinette, Troy and Get Him to the Greek. Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 5, 2014 Annie Bridesmaids standout Rose Byrne is in talks to join Jamie Foxx, Cameron Diaz and Quvenzhane Wallis in the upcoming Annie movie remake, according to Variety. Byrne will take on the role of Benjamin Stacks’ (Foxx) assistant Grace. Directed by Will Gluck, this contemporary Annie is aiming for a 2014 holiday release. View Commentslast_img read more

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Three vie for Florida Bar presidency

first_img Three vie for Florida Bar presidency Senior EditorIt’s been 26 years since The Florida Bar held a contested three-way race for president. (In 1984, eventual winner Patrick Emmanuel of Pensacola ended up in a runoff with William Trickel, Jr., of Orlando, with Michael Plunkett, of Berkely, CA, coming in a distant third.)The current three-way race for Bar president for 2012-13 offers three seasoned lawyers, all members of the Board of Governors, vying to lead more than 90,000 Florida lawyers:· Walter “Skip” Campbell, Jr., a 62-year-old former Florida senator who is certified in civil trial law and is a partner at Krupnick, Campbell, Malone, Buser, Slama, Hancock, Liberman & McKee in Ft. Lauderdale;· John “Jake” Schickel, a 62-year-old former prosecutor and a founding partner of Coker, Schickel, Sorenson & Posgay in Jacksonville, where his law practice areas are medical malpractice, personal injury, professional liability, civil trial, workers’ compensation, and mediation;· Gwynne Alice Young, a 60-year-old former prosecutor, shareholder at Carlton Fields, and leader of the Tampa Business Litigation and Trade Regulation Practice Group, practicing commercial, real estate, probate, and insurance litigation.Here’s a look at the trio of lawyers hoping to be sworn in as president of the Bar in June 2012, following President-elect Scott Hawkins’ 2011-12 term.Walter “Skip” Campbell, Jr. Skip Campbell is the first to admit he’s been criticized for “breaking ranks and cutting in on two other people” in the race to be Bar president in 2012.But this experienced politician, who served a decade as state senator and unsuccessfully ran for attorney general in 2006, thinks elections are a good thing — including the way lawyers choose their Bar president.“I never cut in on anybody. If I’m not the person for the job, I’m not going to win. Life will go on. And if the constituency of Florida lawyers thinks I’m the best candidate and I win, I’ll do the best job I can,” he said.“We have not had enough democratic elections for the Bar presidency in years. I think it’s good to have three quality people put their credentials on the table, and have the lawyers of the state of Florida choose who they think will do the best job as a member of the legal profession,” Campbell said, adding he has “nothing but the highest praise for Gwynne and Jake.”“It’s always been a passion of mine to stay active with the Bar and help lawyers of the state of Florida,” said Campbell, who first served on the Board of Governors from 1988-96 and was going to run for Bar president in 1996, but withdrew to run for a Senate seat.“I think elections make everybody a little bit sharper. You’ll get the opportunity to hear what people are saying about the profession.”What “a lot of people” have told him, Campbell said, is that his experience as a legislator would come in handy walking the halls of the Capitol as Bar president, seeking a fair shake for lawyers. He said he would lobby for funding not only for the judiciary, but state attorneys, public defenders, and other government lawyers “who don’t make a lot of money and still have [law school] debts that you can’t believe: $150,000!”Saying the executive and legislative branches “have taken pot shots at us,” Campbell said: “We are at a crossroads of government dealing with the third branch of government, our judiciary.. . . “A lot of people have said my experience as a legislator would be wise at this period of time to try to see if we can do the best we can with our second and first branches, the legislative and executive.. . . “We have to make sure people understand that the entire third branch of government has to be properly funded; also, to make sure the civil side of the picture is not paying for everybody else. We have to find ways of actually coming through with the funding.”When it comes to a goal of fostering respect for the profession, Campbell speaks about countering the embarrassment caused by Ft. Lauderdale lawyer Scott Rothstein’s $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme that “gave us a real black eye, or an additional black eye.”Wanting to “make sure lawyers of the state of Florida are not getting the brunt of criticism when probably 99.7 percent do such a good job,” Campbell said he wants to make sure the public notices the good things lawyers do.“The legal profession has a lot to offer the citizens of the state of Florida. I believe strongly the presidency of the Bar is a significant position which can, in fact, make people either have a lot of respect for us or make people say we’re not doing such a hot job.”Asked if it would be an uphill battle to be a familiar Democrat at the Republican-controlled Legislature, Campbell said, “You’ve got to remember during my years in the Florida Senate, I served as chairman of three significant committees. I was a Democrat in a Republican-controlled Senate.. . . I believe that we are here as people first, and we should have respect for each other. That’s what I would try to let the people up in Tallahassee know: We respect them and they should respect us, too.”If chosen Bar president, Campbell said his priorities would include listening to lawyers about how to improve bar programs.“The Bar, in my opinion, is a very well run and highly respected bar association in the country. We don’t need to fix something that’s not broken. Can you improve it? Yes, in how we address programs.“That’s where my focus will be: trying to find out the good ideas lawyers have to make the profession better.”Asked for specifics, Campbell answered: “Every program has the potential to be improved upon,” and he’s open to listening how to make that happen.Campbell said this phrase best epitomizes his law firm and himself: “Having a passion for justice, but having compassion for people. That’s my philosophy as a lawyer and my philosophy, if duly elected.”It helps to have statewide name recognition, Campbell said.“People who know me know I am sincere and try to do the best job I can.”Campbell, a licensed helicopter pilot who flies seaplanes and is a member of the Lawyer-Pilots Bar Association, is board liaison to the Aviation Law Certification Committee, and is a member of the Trial Lawyers Section.A 1973 graduate of the University of Florida College of Law, Campbell began his career with a defense firm in Miami, and then joined with Jon Krupnick in Broward County. In 1975, they became known as Krupnick & Campbell. He has served as an adjunct law professor at Nova Southeastern Shepard Broad Law Center, has been a review editor for Matthew Bender Publishing Company, and has hosted a television show, “You and the Law.”Campbell has served as president of the Broward County Bar Association, Broward County Trial Lawyers’ Association, and the Federal Bar Association of Broward County.Last year, Campbell won a special election runoff for a 17th Circuit seat on the Bar Board of Governors, filling the vacancy left by the departure of Allison Bethel, who resigned from the board after she became a law professor in Chicago.John Jacob “Jake” Schickel Jake Schickel considers his five-member personal injury firm in hometown Jacksonville his second family.He’s known partners Howard Coker (1998 Bar president) and Charles Sorenson since high school. Coker and Schickel were frat brothers at Sigma Alpha Epsilon and went to law school together at the University of Florida, where Schickel lettered in track and field and was inducted into the UF Hall of Fame and Florida Blue Key.All three began their law careers at the Fourth Circuit State Attorney’s Office under Ed Austin, where Schickel, as chief assistant state attorney, created one of the first pretrial intervention programs in the state.“One of the things I’m most proud of is I’ve had a varied career. I’ve been an assistant state attorney. I’ve been in a small firm and understand what the small firm lawyer has to deal with. I like to think I’m a doer,” Schickel said.He proudly counts among his achievements helping create the Bar’s new Alternative Dispute Resolution Section and helping lead redesign efforts of the Bar’s website to be rolled out in early 2011.In the community, Schickel helped create career academies in public schools and chaired the Jacksonville Electric Authority, helping push through a merger of the water, sewer, and electric systems in 1995, a convenient consolidation of utilities that he says “worked out marvelously.”At Florida Coastal School of Law, he’s taught evidence, civil procedure, workers’ comp, and ADR.When he travels to meetings of the Board of Governors, he’s likely to bring one of his baked goods creations to pass around the table — banana nut bread a specialty, as well as maple pecan crunch dubbed “Schicklets.”Serving on the Board of Governors since 2005, Schickel is a member of the Executive Committee, Strategic Planning Committee, chaired the Budget Committee in 2009-10, and served on the Board of Legal Specialization and Education for a dozen years, including serving as chair in 1995-97. He also served on The Florida Bar Foundation Board of Directors from 2000-2005. In 2006, the Bar named him the Justice Harry Lee Anstead “Board Certified Lawyer of the Year.”Given that varied background in Bar service, when asked the top three challenges facing The Florida Bar, Schickel answered: “The economy and the economy and the economy.”“The economy has affected small firms and government lawyers. I think the economy has affected how lawyers react to each other, in professionalism and civility matters,” said Schickel, who received the 2010 professionalism award from the Jacksonville Bar.“I’m seeing more and more instances where lawyers are pressured by clients to take unreasonable and unprofessional appeals. And lawyers don’t know how to handle it,” Schickel said.“Procedural, nonsubstantive matters are being insisted upon by the client,” he said.Hard-driving clients hire lawyers and insist: “I want a bulldog. I want you to go in there and yell and scream and be aggressive. I want you to get every document in the world that every person has,” Schickel recounts.A recent example he heard about in Jacksonville was during a dissolution of marriage case, the husband and wife could not decide which college their child should attend, so they wanted the judge to pick.In response to these kinds of problems, Schickel said the Bar has the ability to provide more member benefits and services that offer guidance.“I think we have the ability to provide more free and reduced CLE, more assistance with e-filing that’s coming along. And we have to try to find more creative ways to help lawyers in their dealings. The economy affects them and impacts them.”Some improved Bar services, Schickel said, include an improved “Find a Lawyer” feature on the website that’s searchable and offers a V card that is easier to download.“We’re trying to make the office practice of law better and easier for lawyers,” he said.He wants to continue to bring more benefits to lawyers at reduced prices or free of charge. And he supports the Board of Governors’ and Program Evaluation Committee’s recent recommendation to create a special committee to study lawyer referral service rules.Bettering lawyer-to-lawyer relationships is another goal, working with local professionalism groups.“I think lawyers in various communities get along pretty well,” he said. “I think there’s some tension when someone out of town comes in.”He also envisions a how-to column in the Bar News that would tackle common challenges lawyers face in the everyday practice of law in a Q-and-A format, such as: “I’m a sole practitioner. My office needs to write a trust account check and I’m not there. Can I let my secretary do it?”“We could do the same thing with professionalism. I saw where a lawyer had asked for a one-week continuance to file a brief because one of his parents had been diagnosed with cancer. The client said, ‘no.’ And the opposing lawyer objected to it. The lawyer was crushed. This is one of the things tied with the economic picture. Lawyers are afraid to lose business and stand up to the client. A week continuance isn’t a big deal. So the column could answer: ‘How do I deal with a client who does this sort of thing?’ Just a short message to the membership.”Board certified in civil trial and workers’ compensation and a Florida Supreme Court certified mediator, Schickel is a member of the ADR, Trial Lawyers, and Workers’ Compensation sections. He serves as board liaison to the Voluntary Bar Liaison Committee, the Workers’ Compensation Certification Committee, and the Workers’ Compensation Rules Advisory Committee.Schickel said a “number of former presidents and former leaders of the Bar” encouraged him to run for Bar president-elect, an idea that has been brewing for several years.“I think they believe I have the ability and wherewithal to hopefully be a good president,” he said.Gwynne Alice Young When Gwynne Young was hired as the first female prosecutor in the 13th Circuit in 1974, she said, “You could count the number of women lawyers in Hillsborough County on one hand.”Three years earlier, when she started law school at the University of Florida, only 34 out of 334 students were women.“We live in a different world,” says Young, a shareholder at Carlton Fields since 1982, five years after she joined the firm. “I am pleased that now women lawyers are 34 percent of the members of the Bar.”But it’s not her gender that most distinguishes her from the other two candidates. Young zeroes in on her experience as a business lawyer that sets her apart from her two opponents.“My litigation practice is business litigation,” Young says, focusing on commercial disputes, real estate disputes, title disputes, and probate litigation.“I have been active in the Real Property, Probate and Trust Law and the Business Law sections of the Bar. I’m also a member of the Trial Lawyers Section. My focus as a lawyer is different than my two opponents. Both of them are involved in the personal injury arena. I have contact with different segments of the Bar.. . . The primary distinguishing factor has to be the breadth of my practice and involvement in the business side of the law.”She stresses that The Florida Bar represents all lawyers who are members of the Bar, and that includes transactional lawyers, lawyers who represent business interests, trial lawyers, and family lawyers.“What I bring is someone who has had exposure to a broad range of areas of practice.”Should she become elected Bar president, Young said one focus would be ensuring the Bar meets the needs of all lawyers, and she touts her strong commitment to diversity and “ensuring that minorities and other groups that aren’t necessarily involved with the Bar can be involved with the Bar.. . . “Our Bar is increasingly diverse in a wide variety of ways. I think we have to be mindful of meeting the needs of our diverse membership. I say that not only from the gender, race, and ethnicity standpoint, but also the fact that we have different types of lawyers that we need to ensure we meet their needs,” she said.For example, she said, government lawyers make up 16 percent of the Bar membership but “sometimes feel disaffected from the Bar,” and she would support efforts to once again allow agencies to pay Bar fees for government lawyers.Likewise, there is a significant number of small and solo practitioners particularly hard hit by the down economy.“We have to be sensitive to more inclusion for all our members. The second prong of that is to look at whether there are practical ways to better involve the full spectrum of our members. For example, the Program Evaluation Committee is looking at whether there are things we can do to assist our members adversely affected by our economy and whether we can make members better aware of services.”A second focus would be the ongoing issue of the public perception of lawyers.“The significant increase in discipline claims is a big issue facing the Bar. We have a very well-run discipline system, but we have to be ever mindful that we are a regulatory body and we have to make sure we are effectively handling those issues in a time when those discipline matters are increasing,” Young said.But the No. 1 issue, she said, is the challenge of judicial funding when the state faces an additional $3.5 billion shortfall and the court trust fund is taking in less in fees.“Ensuring our courts are adequately funded, so that our judiciary is in a position to function well and to serve the public properly, is the most critical issue facing the Bar right now. It’s the No. 1 priority of our strategic plan, and I think it probably will continue to be so for the foreseeable future.”Now in her eighth year on the Board of Governors, Young has chaired the Budget Committee, twice chaired the Program Evaluation Committee, served on the Executive Committee for four years, served on the Rules Committee and on the Special Committee on Judicial Independence, and has been involved in the strategic planning process.“I have certainly enjoyed my Bar service,” Young said. “I have seen how well the Bar is run and what good things the Bar does. I’ve gotten a lot of encouragement from fellow board members and staff members to consider running.”She’s undaunted to compete in a three-way race.“Frankly, I feel like I’ve worked hard and developed a strong support base. It’s interesting to have three candidates. I’m not sure how different it is to having two.. . but it does create some interest. Previously, we had no candidate from South Florida and now we have one. I welcome the competition, and I think I’m up for it.”Raised in a family that had two dogs named Blue Devil, Young is a big fan of Duke University, where she received her undergraduate degree, serving as trustee, president of the alumni association, and on the athletics advisory board.At UF, she was executive editor of Florida Law Review and served as trustee of the UF Law Center Association, Inc.She received The Florida Bar President’s Pro Bono Service Award for the 13th Circuit in 2003, and was named the Young Lawyers Section “Most Productive Young Lawyer” in 1983-84.Active in the Hillsborough County Bar Association, Young was president in 2001-02, is a former chair of the Second Appellate District Nominating Commission, and served on the Federal Judicial Nominating Commission.Ballots for the contested election will be mailed to eligible voters on or before March 1. Voters will have the option of voting online in lieu of returning their paper ballot. All votes must be received before midnight, March 21. Any runoff will be conducted between April 1 and April 22. January 1, 2011 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Regular News Three vie for Florida Bar presidencylast_img read more

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AMN Careers: Customer Service Manager, CRP Industries

first_imgLSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. Join the CRP team! CRP Industries Inc. is a family-owned, mid-sized import and distribution company located in Cranbury, NJ. The company is currently seeking a Customer Service Manager.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement To find out more about this job opportunity and to apply, click on the link above or see more opportunities from CRP Industries and others on the AMN Careers page. To learn more about posting a job opening at your company on the AMN Careers page, click here.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

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It’s the talk of the town

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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AGC Instruments launches data sheet

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Kinetiko Energy: Gas Flows from Second Pilot Well (South Africa)

first_imgKinetiko Energy announced significant gas flows from KA-10PTR in addition to the previously reported flows of 332Mscf/day from KA-03PTR located 8km away further support the exploration geophysical logs and coal desorption data indicating widespread gas in coal and conventional gas in adjacent sandstones.Pilot test well KA-10PTR has produced an estimated gas flow rate of 45mscf/d over the first 10 day period. The well is now shut in for a pressure build up test and will then be shut in, pending further technical and JV negotiations.Five exploration pilot test wells have been drilled and two continue to be tested on the Northern Licence (56ER). KA-03PT certified test results were announced to the ASX in March 2013. Initial down hole pump problems with KA-1OPT were overcome with a redrill and KA-10PTR has successfully flowed gas at significant rates. The hole is now being pressure tested. KA-11PT and KA-07PT have shown gas but will require further work if they are to be properly flow tested, they will be revisited once the JV parties have reached agreement on funding. KA-05PT yielded some gas flow but not enough to warrant further testing.KA-10PTR redrill was spudded 27th May and has produced a measured stabilized gas flow of 45mscf/d over a 10 day period. The well is now shut in for a pressure build up test and afterwards will be shut in, pending further technical and JV review.Initial commercial studies indicated that flow rates of 45mscf/d can be commercial due to the project’s low cost (vertical drilling, completions and production environment) and very attractive local gas market demand and pricing.The O&G regulator (PASA) has approved up to 8 Pilot Test wells on the Southern Licence (38ER) of which 5 are planned to be drilled as part of Phase 2. As in the Northern license area, the pilot test wells will be located in areas identified in exploration drilling to contain gassy intervals and geophysical well log indications of conventional gas in the sandstones.[mappress]LNG World News Staff, July 10, 2013; Image: Kinetiko Energylast_img read more

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High Court admonishes Slater and Gordon solicitor for disclosure omission

first_imgThe High Court has criticised a solicitor from national firm Slater and Gordon for failing to disclose a judgment with direct consequences for his case.The personal injury claim was first brought two years ago, in February 2015, by the English victim of a road traffic accident and members of her family, following the incident in Costa Rica, central America, in 2009.At that time some existing authorities supported the scope of jurisdiction that was argued for. But a Court of Appeal judgment, Brownlie v Four Seasons Holdings Inc, in June 2015, has since taken away that support.In Gunn & Ors v Diaz & Ors, The Honourable Mrs Justice Andrews DBE explained that an application for an extension of time for service of the claim form was made in March 2016 by Slater and Gordon solicitor Paul McClorry ‘without notice’ of the latest case law.The judge outlined the duty on claimants to make full and frank disclosure of all material facts, and stressed the relevance of a particular matter was a decision for the court and not the lawyers.Andrews said in this case that duty had been breached, after the claimant solicitors had ‘plainly overlooked’ the passage on duty of disclosure in the White Book 2016.She said that ‘had [McClorry] thought about it, it should have been obvious’ the court would wish to know the consequences of a decision of the Court of Appeal, handed down nine months previously, dealing with service out of the jurisdiction.The Court of Appeal in Brownlie ruled that ‘damage’ for the purposes of the tort gateway meant direct damage, no consequential loss, making the law applicable on the basis of where the damage occurs, regardless of the countries in which indirect consequences could occur.An appeal is due to be heard by the Supreme Court in May.Andrews said the judgment in Brownlie meant the sole legal basis for the services upon which the claimants were asking for more time had effectively disappeared. She said the court had no basis for extending jurisdiction over any defendants in respect of the accident in Costa Rica, and there was no lawful basis to serve a claim form out of the jurisdiction.Andrews said even when McClorry filed a witness statement in August 2016, no mention was made of the Brownlie judgment.Howard Palmer QC, speaking for the claimants, said McClorry was ‘quite right’ not to include reference to the Brownlie decision as the court was being asked only to decide on an extension based on the slow machinery of the Costa Rican process.But Andrews said this was wrong, and her court was being asked to extend time for service of a claim on foreign defendants over whom the English court had no jurisdiction.She noted there was no mention of the Brownlie decision or its impact, and this would have been relevant when the court granted an extension of time in March 2016.She added: ‘The claimants’ solicitors were aware of the Court of Appeal’s judgment; they ought to have been aware of its potential impact and that, at the very least, it decided that the relevant rule on which they had relied when obtaining permission to serve out, had been misinterpreted (to their clients’ advantage).‘They ought to have told the court about it, so that it could decide what to do. I accept that the non-disclosure was not deliberate, but that does not mean that it was not culpable.‘A reasonable solicitor, particularly one practising in the field of personal injury claims as Mr McClorry does, would have appreciated the ramifications of Brownlie, and would have drawn it to the court’s attention.’Andrews said the non-disclosure was serious enough to require ‘consequences’ to be visited on the party which was responsible.She set aside an order for service of the claim form and particulars of claim as they were out of the jurisdiction and granted relief for defendants in the case.last_img read more

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Arriva selected to operate Den Haag – Brussels inter-city service

first_imgEUROPE: A letter of intent to launch a direct inter-city service linking Den Haag and Brussels was signed by the City of Den Haag, Brussels Airport and DB subsidiary Arriva on June 21. The Lage Landenlijn trains would re-instate a through service which was lost when the Benelux trains ceased in December with the launch of the troubled Fyra International service.Den Haag council was keen to reinstate a direct link the Belgian capital, and also have a link to Brussels Airport. On February 8 it established The Hague Trains Holding bv, which invited tenders for operation of the planned Lage Landenlijn service by May 24. Train paths have been requested from Dutch infrastructure manager ProRail and operating details are now to be finalised with the aim of launching services in December 2015, or earlier if possible. Hourly trains would run from Den Haag CS to Brussels Midi, calling at Delft, Rotterdam Centraal, Dordrecht, Roosendaal, Antwerpen Centraal, Mechelen, Brussels Airport and Brussels Central. Fares would be similar to existing inter-city trains, and reservations would not be required. Anne Hettinga, Managing Director of Arriva Nederland, said the company had a proven track record both in the Netherlands and internationally, and believed the proposed service would be feasible. According to the Brussels Airport authority, around 300 000 Dutch passengers/year use the airport, of which most travel by car. Routing the trains via the airport could allow rail to capture up to 40% of the business, it anticipates.last_img read more

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PM on LIAT Funding: I Have No Regrets Whatsoever

first_img 150 Views   no discussions The Hon Minister for Finance and Prime Minister, Roosevelt Skerrit says he has no regrets about investing in LIAT over the years.LIAT’s departure from the regional air travel scene leaves travellers to Dominica with five airlines from which to choose.LAT, after bailouts from its shareholder partners, is slated for liquidation amidst a heavy debt burden exceeding a hundred million dollars, accoridng to Chair of Shareholder Governments, Dr Ralph Gonsalves.“We appreciated the exceptional contribution of LIAT to Dominica’s economy and to the Caribbean. LIAT had its own issues which is natural to the circumstance because in many respects LIAT would fly to destinations that they should not be flying [to] from an economic standpoint but realizing they had a greater regional responsibility. We treated LIAT as a public good,” Hon Prime Minister Skerrit said responding to a question of why its financiers would continue investing in a sinking company.“This is why four governments continued to invest in LIAT and we have done so with no regrets  I have no regrets whatsoever for putting our taxpayers money into LIAT.”He said that Dominica is grateful for the service which the now failed airline has delivered.““We have always stated that our investment in LIAT was to assure Dominican residents and visitors of Dominica the ability to get in and out of Dominica and LIAT provided in great respect that assurance. LIAT during that period served us pretty well and we are grateful especially during disaster times.”He described the airline’s failure as a sad reality worsened by the covid recession but said to critics,  “There is the saying you never miss the water until the well runs dry. All of us who were criticizing LIAT are now asking where is LIAT and why isn’t LIAT coming back to the air.”The Prime Minister added that if a new LIAT is to emerge, Dominica will continue to support.“…We have indicated our position on this. That…if this is going to assure flights to Dominica, we will support.” BusinessLocalNewsRegional PM on LIAT Funding: I Have No Regrets Whatsoever by: – July 13, 2020 Share Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! Share Tweetlast_img read more

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Safety first as Farmington Hills garden centers open

first_img Farmington Voice Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) by Beverly ChurchBrad Zoner, owner of Farmer John’s Greenhouse in Farmington Hills, could have opened last weekend when Gov. Gretchen Whitmer lifted restrictions on garden centers. But first, he wanted to make sure the store was safe for both customers and employees. (Beverly Church)“I wanted to make sure I had all the safeguards in place,” he said, and instead opened the store last Monday. At the entrance, customers will find rows of sanitized carts, just the first of measures taken to slow the spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).“When you come in the front door, there’s another sanitizing station for your hands,” Zoner said. “We’re asking customers, if they want to enter, to wear a mask. We have plexiglass at the registers. Our bathrooms are sanitized after every use. Customers and employees…have to keep the six-foot distance. It’s a big store, so people can spread out very well.”While Farmer John’s is not offering curbside service at this time, Zoner said there hasn’t been a big demand for it. He said his garden center has so many varieties that it would be difficult to put the whole menu online.A volunteer sanitizes a porch swing at Farmer John’s Greenhouse to help keep customers safe. (Beverly Church)“There might be 50 types of hostas (and) six different types of salmon geraniums,” he said. “We could do curbside for soil and a few basic things,” but he said most people want to come into the store.Wait to plantJohn Steinkopf of the family-owned Steinkopf Nursery in Farmington Hills also has made safety a priority.In addition to cleaning and sanitizing, “We leave the front door (to our office) open so no one has to open the door, and we’re only allowing one or two customers in at a time,” he said. “We’re all wearing masks and gloves, and we’re asking the customers to all wear masks.”Both greenhouses are busy stocking up on plants and flowers, but Steinkopf said customers should wait a bit to plant annuals and vegetables. If you plant them now, he said, they won’t survive.“People sometimes see them early and think it’s okay (to plant them), but it’s not,” he said. “You have to be very careful with anything that’s tender,” and recommends waiting at least until mid-May.(Beverly Church)Little demand for curbsideNow entering its 89th year in business, Steinkopf Nursery is offering curbside service. But Steinkopf said most people prefer to choose their plants in person.“Unless it’s something ordinary, like soils or fertilizers, 99 percent of the people want to look at what they’re buying,” he said. “It makes you feel better to actually see the plants.”Brad Zoner agrees, and said that after weeks of being home, customers are enjoying coming into the garden center.“People just want to get out of the house and be around plants,” he said. “Some people may feel scared to go out, but I think they’ll relax once they come through the door. You can come in and feel safe.”Farmer John’s, 26950 Haggerty, Farmington Hills, is open daily 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. After May 1, hours will expand from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call 248-553-7141. Steinkopf Nursery, 20815 Farmington Road, Farmington Hills, is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 248-474-2925 Reported bylast_img read more

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