Who’s Competing

first_img 29 November 2017, 11:17 Team Ireland Equestrian’s showjumpers compete at Stockholm (SWE), Wellington Florida (USA), Lichtenvoorde (NED) and Barcelona (ESP). In endurance, Ireland will be represented at Punta Del Este (URU). This week 28 entries have been made for 13 Irish riders competing in FEI international competitions worldwide. Heading into the last month of the year, almost 7,000 international entries have been made for Irish riders in 2017 to date.All Irish international entries for this week’s shows are now available to view by clicking on the individual shows under ‘FEI Entries & Results’. Live links to results from this week’s shows are also available. Follow your Team Ireland Equestrian riders on the HSI website, Facebook (Team Ireland Equestrian) and Twitter (@TeamIRLEq). Tags: Who’s Competing Home  »  Disciplines News  »  Other Disciplines  »  Endurance news  »  Who’s Competing last_img read more

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APNewsBreak: Medicare bought meds for dead people

first_imgWASHINGTON | Call it drugs for the departed: Medicare’s prescription program kept paying for costly medications even after patients were dead.The problem was traced back to a head-scratching bureaucratic rule that’s now getting a second look.A report coming out Friday from the Health and Human Services Department’s inspector general says the Medicare rule allows payment for prescriptions filled up to 32 days after a patient’s death — at odds with the program’s basic principles, not to mention common sense.“Drugs for deceased beneficiaries are clearly not medically indicated, which is a requirement for (Medicare) coverage,” the IG report said. It urged immediate changes to eliminate or restrict the payment policy.Medicare said it’s working on a fix.Investigators examined claims from 2012 for a tiny sliver of Medicare drugs — medications to treat HIV, the virus that causes AIDS — and then cross-referenced them with death records. They found that the program paid for drugs for 158 beneficiaries after they were already dead. The cost to taxpayers: $292,381, an average of $1,850 for each beneficiary.Medicare’s “current practices allowed most of these payments to occur,” the report said.Of 348 prescriptions dispensed for the dead beneficiaries, nearly half were filled more than a week after the patient died. Sometimes multiple prescriptions were filled on behalf of a single dead person.Investigators don’t know what happened to the medications obtained on behalf of dead people, but some may have been diverted to the underground market for prescription medicines. The report said HIV drugs can be targets for fraud since they can be very expensive; one common HIV drug costs about $1,700 for a month’s supply, it said.Medicare is the government’s premier health insurance program, providing coverage to about 55 million seniors and disabled people. Prescription coverage delivered through private insurance plans began in 2006 as a major expansion of the program. But it’s also been a target for scams.The report did not estimate the potential financial impact across the $85 billion-a-year Medicare prescription program known as Part D. But investigators believe the waste may add up to millions of dollars.“The exposure for the entire Part D program could be significant,” said Miriam Anderson, team leader on the report. “The payment policy is the same for all drugs, whether they are $2,000 drugs to treat HIV or $4 generic drugs.”In a formal response, Medicare agreed with the investigators’ recommendations.“After reviewing this report, (Medicare) has had preliminary discussions with the industry to revisit the need for a 32-day window,” wrote Marilyn Tavenner, the Obama administration’s Medicare chief.Medicare had originally maintained that the date of service listed in the billing records could instead reflect when a pharmacy submitted bills for payment. That billing date might have actually occurred after a prescription was filled, since some nursing home and institutional pharmacies submit their bills in monthly bundles.However, the inspector general’s investigators found that about 80 percent of the prescriptions for dead beneficiaries were filled at neighborhood pharmacies, undercutting Medicare’s first explanation. As for the remainder, the investigators said they didn’t see any reason pharmacies can’t report an accurate date of service.Investigators said they stumbled on the problem during an examination of coverage for AIDS drugs dispensed to Medicare beneficiaries. Sexually transmitted diseases are an increasingly recognized problem among older people.That earlier investigation raised questions about expensive medications billed on behalf of nearly 1,600 Medicare recipients.Some had no HIV diagnosis in their records, but they were prescribed the drugs anyway. Others were receiving excessively large supplies of medications. Several were getting prescriptions filled from an unusually large number of pharmacies.Prescription drug fraud has many angles. When the high price of a drug puts it out of reach for certain patients, it can create an underground market. And some medications, like painkillers and anti-anxiety pills, are constantly sought after by people with substance-abuse issues.___last_img read more

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Springboks squad race storm brews

first_imgNational trade union body Cosatu claimed five unnamed black Springboks had complained to the organisation of racial discrimination.Meyer issued a denial, saying “I do not look at colour — I look at the best players. I have a great relationship with my players.”Little-known group the Agency for a New Agenda (ANA) went to court this month, wanting the Springboks to surrender their passports, which would prevent them competing at the World Cup.The case was dropped, but the judge criticised the tortoise-like pace of rugby racial reform and committed the court to probe the matter further, saying it was a “national interest” issue.Particularly upsetting for those opposed to what they consider a too-white national rugby team was the dropping of black winger Conrad Hendricks to accomodate white full-back Jesse Kriel against Argentina.A common complaint against Meyer is that he chooses whites in positions where they do not usually play rather than pick a black who regularly fills the role.White scrum-half Francois Hougaard admitted several season ago that he was embarrassed to be given the No. 11 national team shirt when black Lwazi Mvovo was excelling as a winger.Race has long been an emotive issue with whites believing black players weaken their beloved two-time world champions Springboks and blacks angry at “snow white” teams representing a country whose population is 90 percent black.Meyer included nine blacks in his 31-man World Cup squad, but others like centre Lionel Mapoe, who sparkled for the Lions during the 2015 Super Rugby season, must have been disappointed not to make it.“You only see black players when they shoot adverts,” former Bulls winger John Mametsa told Johannesburg daily The New Age.“This discrimination will not end anytime soon. What is happening is depressing and unfair to black players. The Springboks are still stuck in the past.“Why does it take a white player one bad year to be dropped, but only one bad match for a black to be dropped?.“Black players who do well do not get opportunities. I do not think Meyer is 100 percent honest regarding the reasons.”Columnist and former Springboks official Mark Keohane does not believe former Bulls coach Meyer acts out of racism, malice or disregard for the merits of black players.South Africa’s head coach Heyneke Meyer (R) stirred a storm of protest by picking 13 white starters against Argentina in a warm-up match for the 2015 Rugby World Cup. PHOTO/AFP“When in doubt, like so many (Springbok coaches) before him, he has found comfort with what he knows — white rugby players.“It is not right and it is not wrong, but in the context of South African rugby, it is not acceptable,” Keohane wrote in Business Day.Rugby author and columnist Liz McGregor noted that there had been no comment from South African Rugby Union (SARU) president Oregan Hoskins, a black, nor chief executive Jurie Roux.SARU and the South African government set a target for 2015 of at least seven black players in each Springbok matchday 23 with at least five on the field throughout a match.Meyer failed to meet these goals in the four World Cup warm-ups with only two black starters in the stunning home defeat by Argentina.A week later, Meyer doubled the number of black starters to four and South Africa won convincingly in Buenos Aries with Mvovo scoring a brilliant try.Plans have been published for 50 percent black representation in the 2019 Springboks World Cup team.The reluctance of many whites to accept black players into what they consider to be their sport runs deep.Instructed to pick at least nine blacks in 22-strong squads for a schools inter-provincial tournament this year, virtually all the predominantly white coaches chose exactly nine.South Africa play Japan on Saturday week in their opening Pool B match and also face Samoa, Scotland and the United States in the league phase of the global rugby showcase.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000South Africa’s Lwazi Mvovo (R) dives to score against Argentina during their 2015 Rugby World Cup warm-up match at Jose Amalfitani stadium in Buenos Aires, Argentina on August 15, 2015. PHOTO/AFPJOHANNESBURG, September 10- The racial composition of the Springboks was a heated issue among South Africans before the squad announcement for the Rugby World Cup, which kicks off in England next week.After giving blacks limited opportunities during recent defeats by Australia and New Zealand, coach Heyneke Meyer stirred a storm of protest by picking 13 white starters against Argentina in another warm-up match.last_img read more

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