Indonesia cites twisted bowel in death of Javan rhino

first_imgLast month, rangers in Indonesia’s Ujung Kulon National Park found an adult male rhino dead on a beach.A necropsy determined the rhino’s death was due to complications from a twisted bowel, putting to rest fears of poaching or contagion.Despite the death, the Javan rhino population has shown stable growth with the birth of two calves earlier this year, putting the tally at minimum 68 individuals. JAKARTA — Veterinarians and wildlife experts in Indonesia have determined the death of a rhinoceros in the west coast of Java Island last week was due to fatal complications from a twisted intestine. The announcement puts to rest fears the animal could have been killed by poachers or an infectious disease.Rangers at Ujung Kulon National Park, home to the only remaining population of the critically endangered Javan rhino (Rhinoceros sondaicus), on April 23 found an adult male rhino dead on one of the park’s beaches. The animal was thought to be 30 years old and was affectionately known as Samson. His death brought the total known population of the species to 68 individuals.None of the rhino’s body parts were missing, indicating that poaching was not the cause of death, and a preliminary examination showed no signs of poisoning or contagious infection. The park’s officials then took tissue samples to make a conclusive report on the cause of the death.The body of a Javan rhinoceros was found last month near a beach at an Indonesian national park. Image courtesy of WWF-Indonesia.The necropsy found that the rhino’s large and small intestines were twisted, eventually releasing bacterial toxins that spread throughout the body, according to a team of veterinarians from Bogor Agricultural University (IPB) and WWF-Indonesia.This condition is not new to the species. A 2012 paper by a veterinarian at IPB found that the intestinal condition had killed five Javan rhinos in 1982 and one in 2003.“The most important thing is that the death was not because of rhino poaching, as the horn is still attached,” said Kurnia Khairani, a veterinarian with WWF, in an April 27 statement. “The necropsy result also indicates that [the death] was not from infection or contagious diseases, like anthrax.”Experts had feared the possibility of an epidemic. With the entire species confined to a single nature reserve, a contagious disease could potentially wipe out the Javan rhino for good.Although the death was attributed to natural causes, it adds urgency to calls for a portion of the population to be relocated to a second site.The Indonesian government and rhino experts have since 2015 been scouting for such a site, to avoid a decline in population due to the park reaching carrying capacity and to serve as insurance against the threats of diseases, poaching and other human incursions, and natural disasters such as tsunamis and volcanic eruptions. Despite the death of Samson, the Javan rhino population has expanded with the birth of two calves earlier this year, putting the tally at minimum 68 individuals: 29 adult males, 24 adult females and 15 juveniles.Veterinarians and wildlife experts take tissue samples from the Javan rhino for a necropsy to pinpoint the cause of death. Image courtesy of WWF-Indonesia.Banner image: A park ranger examines the male Javan rhino found dead on April 23. Image courtesy of the Ujung Kulon National Park Agency.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Javan Rhinos, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

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Deforestation for rubber ramps up near UNESCO site in Cameroon

first_imgImage by Greenpeace Africa.Satellite imagery from Planet Labs and data from Global Forest Watch shows the extent of clearing at the Sudcam concession as of March 21, 2018.According to the Greenpeace Africa report, Sudcam’s concession violates a number of established rules and agreements. For one, its current proximity to Dja reportedly defies assurance by company management to UNESCO and IUCN inspectors that they would maintain a forest buffer belt of at least five kilometers between the plantation and the reserve.In June 2017, members of indigenous Baka communities reportedly told Greenpeace Africa researchers that their settlements inside the Sudcam concession had been completely destroyed. According to the report, this forced them “to move without being offered either a resettlement plan or compensation.”The 45,000-hectare concession was awarded to Sudcam in 2008. However, according to CIFOR research, this appears to have violated Cameroonian law that prohibits development in areas occupied by communities. The researchers write that the award of the concession may have been motivated by an “influential member of the Cameroonian political elite.”In the village of EmviengII, Sudcam reportedly offered fish for land compensation. Photo by Nchemty Metimi Ozongashu / Greenpeace Africa.While there is a lack of transparency regarding Sudcam ownership, Greenpeace highlights the proximity of the concession to land owned by Cameroonian president Paul Biya as well as family connections within the company.“Notably, Sudcam’s plantation lies only seven kilometres from the Mvomeka’a mansion, security compound and airstrip of Cameroon’s head of state Paul Biya, who has held power for over 35 years,” the Greenpeace report states. “A 2016 company document seen by Greenpeace Africa indicates Serge Baroux Mounier, the French brother-in-law of Biya’s son Franck, as a director of Sudcam.”The Greenpeace Africa report also finds Sudcam’s forest clearance and community displacement process violates the procurement policies of several of the rubber companies that buy from it. These include Bridgestone, Michelin and Goodyear, which require their rubber supply chains be free from deforestation (and land-grabbing, in the case of Goodyear).Mongabay reached out to Sudcam parent company Halcyon Agri Corporation Ltd., but received no response by press time. In an earlier response to Earthsite and Greenpeace reports released April 27 (but has since been removed), Halcyon Agri denied connection to the government and refuted allegations that it violated land rights of Baka communities.In an email to Greenpeace Africa referenced in their report, Halcyon Agri CEO Robert Meyer wrote the company is seeking to improve and that “Sudcam is a wonderful asset and one that has the potential to be a working model on how ecological, sociological and economical agendas can be dovetailed into a win-win situation.” A new report by Greenpeace Africa finds this future-plantation has grown by 2,300 hectares in one year between April 2017 and April 2018. In total, Greenpeace estimates around 10,050 hectares have been deforested since clearing began in 2011, and warns that 20,000 more hectares of rainforest are slated for clearing in the coming years.The 45,000-hectare (450-square kilometer) concession is owned by China-owned Sud Cameroun Hévéa (Sudcam), and is located less than one kilometer from Dja Faunal Reserve. The reserve is inhabited by at least 107 mammal species, including critically endangered western lowland forest gorillas. The reserve is also home to the indigenous Baka people.Watchdog and scientific organizations like Greenpeace Africa and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) warn rubber expansion threatens the integrity of Dja and the future of its wildlife.According to the Greenpeace Africa report, Sudcam’s concession violates a number ofestablished rules and agreements, including the rubber sourcing policies of several companies that buy from it. Southern Cameroon is home to some of the most biodiverse areas of African rainforest. It’s also home to a massive area of deforestation destined for rubber cultivation – right across the river from a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Now, a new report by Greenpeace Africa finds this future-plantation has grown by 2,300 hectares in one year between April 2017 and April 2018. In total, Greenpeace estimates around 10,050 hectares have been deforested since clearing began in 2011, and warns that 20,000 more hectares of rainforest are slated for clearing in the coming years.The 45,000-hectare (450-square kilometer) concession is owned by China-owned Sud Cameroun Hévéa (Sudcam), and is located less than one kilometer from Dja Faunal Reserve. The reserve is inhabited by at least 107 mammal species, including critically endangered western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), endangered chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and African forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis). The reserve is also home to the indigenous Baka people. Dja was incorporated as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987, and the organization notes that it is one of the “largest and best-protected rainforests in Africa,” with around 90 percent of its area intact.According to IUCN estimates, Cameroon is home to around 10 percent of remaining western lowland gorillas.But watchdog and scientific organizations like Greenpeace Africa and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) warn rubber expansion threatens the integrity of Dja and the future of its wildlife. An earlier report by Greenpeace Africa called its deforestation activity “by far the most devastating new clearing of forest for industrial agriculture in the Congo Basin.” And according to CIFOR, the development “may have serious negative impacts on the [region’s] rich biodiversity … particularly through the destruction of plant cover, increased hunting and poaching, and wildlife disturbance.”In its newest report, Greenpeace Africa details the clearance of 2,300 additional hectares between April 2017 and April 2018. Effectively increasing the size of the developed area by 22 percent in just one year, this newly cleared area represents a ramp-up in deforestation since clearing began in 2011. This new clearance extends the plantation area further south, as well as east along the border of Dja reserve. Banner image: Deforestation in the Sudcam concession. Photo by Nchemty Metimi Ozongashu / Greenpeace AfricaFeedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Animals, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Indigenous Communities, Industrial Agriculture, Plantations, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Rubber, Tropical Forests, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

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Congo Basin rainforest may be gone by 2100, study finds

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Farming, Forest Loss, Forests, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Population, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Satellite data indicate the Congo Basin lost an area of forest larger than Bangladesh between 2000 and 2014.Researchers found that small-scale farming was the biggest driver, contributing to around 84 percent of deforestation.This kind of farming is primarily done for subsistence by families that have no other livelihood options.The study finds that at current trends, all primary rainforest in the Congo Basin could be cleared by the end of the century. Africa’s Congo Basin is home to the second-largest rainforest on the planet. But according to a new study, this may soon not be the case. It finds that at current rates of deforestation, all primary forest will be gone by the end of the century.The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) in the U.S. who analyzed satellite data collected between 2000 and 2014. Their results were published today in Science Advances. It reveals that the Congo Basin lost around 165,000 square kilometers of forest during their study period.In other words, one of the world’s largest rainforests lost an area of forest bigger than Bangladesh in the span of 15 years.The Congo Basin rainforest is home to many species, such as this okapi (Okapia johnstoni), which is listed as Endangered by the IUCN and is found only in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.But why? Is it due to industrial pressure like in South America and Southeast Asia where the majority of deforestation has been done for soy, palm oil, and other commodity crops? Or commercial logging, which is razing forests on the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea?Not so much, according to this newest study. It reveals that the dominant force behind rising Congo deforestation, driving more than 80 percent of the region’s total forest loss, is actually small-scale clearing for subsistence agriculture. The researchers write that most of it is done by hand with simple axes.According to the authors, the preponderance of small-scale deforestation of Congo rainforest is due largely to poverty stemming from political instability and conflict in the region. The Congo Basin rainforest is shared by six countries: Cameroon, the Central African Republic (CAR), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Equatorial Guinea, the Republic of the Congo (RoC) and Gabon. Of these, the DRC holds the largest share of Congo forest – 60 percent – and is home to more people than the other five combined. The DRC, along with CAR, has a human development index in the bottom 10 percent, meaning that lifespans, education levels and per capita GDP there are among the lowest in the world.Three-year moving average of annual forest loss area for the major disturbance categories in all countries. Image from Tyukavina et al., Sci. Adv. 2018;4: eaat2993With few livelihood options, most people survive by carving farmland out of the forest. These plots are farmed until the soil runs dry of nutrients, whereupon a new plot is cleared and planted.Before now, it wasn’t exactly understood how much this type of smallholder farming called “shifting cultivation” and other forms of small-scale agriculture were contributing to overall Congo deforestation. So UMD researchers looked for patterns signalling different types of deforestation in regional tree cover loss data captured by satellites.According to study coauthor Alexandra Tyukavina, “it was important for us to explicitly quantify proportions of different drivers, to demonstrate just how dominant the small-scale clearing of forests for shifting cultivation is within the region, and to show that it’s not only re-clearing of secondary forests, but also expansion into primary forests.”  Tyukavina is a post-doctoral associate at UMD’s Department of Geographical Sciences.Tyukavina and her colleagues found that small-scale forest clearing for agriculture contributed to around 84 percent of Congo Basin deforestation between 2000 and 2014. When zooming in on the portions contained only in the DRC and CAR, that number goes up to more than 90 percent. The only country where small-scale agriculture isn’t the driving force of deforestation is Gabon, where industrial selective logging is the biggest single cause of forest loss.The study also reveals that the majority – 60 percent – of Congo deforestation between 2000 and 2014 happened in primary forests and woodlands, and in mature secondary forests.Pre-disturbance forest type. (A) Reference pre-disturbance type for sampled pixels identified as forest loss. (B) National estimates of 2000-2014 forest loss area by re-disturbance forest type. Area estimates expressed in ha along with SEs are presented table S2A. Image fro Tyukavina et al., Sci. Adv. 2018;4: eaat2993The United Nations projects that there will be a fivefold increase in human population in the Congo Basin by the end of the century. The researchers found that if current trends hold, this means that there will be no primary Congo rainforest left by 2100.In their study, the researchers also warn of “a new wave” of large-scale clearing for industrial agriculture. While contributing a comparatively scant 1 percent of Congo deforestation during the study period, it appears to be trending upward, particularly in coastal countries.“Land use planning that minimizes the conversion of natural forest cover for agro-industry will serve to mitigate this nascent and growing threat to primary forests,” the researchers write. Citation: Tyukavina, A., et al., (2018) Congo Basin forest loss dominated by increasing smallholder clearing. Science advances  4(11), eaat2993. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aat2993Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Investors warn soy giants of backlash over deforestation in South America

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored agribusiness, Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Rainforest, Amazon Soy, Conservation Finance, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Finance, Forests, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Land Use Change, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Supply Chain, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Zero Deforestation Commitments Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Investors have called on the world’s biggest soy companies to make firm commitments to end deforestation in wildlife-rich areas of South America such as the Cerrado and Gran Chaco.Those that fail to do so risk being exposed by environmental activists to consumer boycotts, legal action and falling profits, experts warn.Investors are leading the way as companies fail to appreciate the scale of the crisis, campaigners say. The world’s leading companies involved in the soy trade are being challenged to come clean about their impact on the environment and to completely eliminate deforestation from their operations.The production of soybeans is one of the leading drivers of forest loss in South America, with Brazil’s savanna-like Cerrado region, which covers 20 percent of the country, especially vulnerable.But institutional fund managers believe those companies that contribute to deforestation, and the associated rise in greenhouse gas emissions, from their involvement in the soy industry are taking risks with both their financial performance and their reputations.For example, there is a real danger of consumer boycotts or legal action as a result of being involved in illegal deforestation or human rights abuses.“If you’re a company that’s operating in a deforestation hotspot such as the Brazilian Cerrado, there is a lot of pressure at the moment from outside stakeholders to reduce that,” said Julie Nash, director of food and capital markets for Ceres, a nonprofit organization advising on issues ranging from climate change and pollution to human rights abuses.Aerial view of new Cerrado forest clearing. Roughly half the deforestation occurring in the Cerrado is legal, say analysts, highlighting the need for legislation to protect this biome – important for its biodiversity, aquifers and carbon storage. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay“That could lead to material market or reputational risk for some of these publicly facing companies dealing with environmental activism,” Nash said. “If they find deforestation within their supply chain, they have the potential to be attacked by environmental advocacy groups.”Nash said companies such as Unilever and Nestlé have committed to zero deforestation and total traceability of their supply chain. “There are leaders,” she said.Cerrado deforestationSince a moratorium on deforesting the Amazon to create new soy plantations was agreed to in 2006, the focus has largely shifted to the Cerrado. An area of savanna and woodlands that once covered 2 million square kilometers (772,000 square miles) — greater than the state of Alaska — the Cerrado has since lost more than half of its natural vegetation to make way for agricultural production in the shape of cattle ranching and soy. More than 100,000 square kilometers (38,600 square miles) has been converted in the past decade.An estimated 43 percent of its plant species are endemic to the region, and more than 300 species of fauna and flora are threatened with extinction. The Cerrado is renowned for being the stronghold for charismatic species such as the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) and giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).Also at risk is the Gran Chaco, a unique area of dry thorn forests and seasonally flooded wetlands covering some 1 million square kilometers (386,000 square miles) across Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil and Paraguay, which lost an average of nearly 3,000 square kilometers (1,160 square miles) a year in Bolivia alone to soy plantations between 2011 and 2015.The cattle which the Cerrado supports help feed the developed world’s hunger for beef. Researchers recommend that rather than converting native Cerrado vegetation to croplands, degraded pastures should be utilized to grow crops such as soy, cotton and corn, while areas of native vegetation should be prioritized for conservation. Image by Rhett A. Butler/MongabayDivesting and politicsIn total, 57 institutional investors with assets totaling $6.3 trillion have supported the release of a statement calling on all companies in the soy supply chain to “demonstrate commitment to eliminating deforestation” by publicly disclosing their policies on the issue, saying where their soy comes from, and describing how they will deal with suppliers that fail to comply with no-deforestation standards.The investors, which include Aviva, Legal & General and BNP Paribas Asset Management, will engage with more than “25 of the largest, publicly traded companies in the soy trading, processing, manufacturing and retail sectors,” Nash said. That category includes companies such as Bunge, a multinational operating across the globe in a wide range of commodities, but not another of the soy heavyweights, Cargill, which is privately owned.Adam Kanzer, head of stewardship-Americas for BNP Paribas Asset Management, described the statement as a “very clear blueprint” of what they would like to see companies do to show their commitment to reducing their impact on the environment.“The politics in Brazil is not particularly good for addressing deforestation right now,” Kanzer said, in reference to the recent election of the right-wing populist Jair Bolsonaro as president, “so there is a real onus on the private sector to take meaningful steps to address this now. The clock is ticking.”Kanzer said he accepted that institutional investors could ultimately show their hand by divesting themselves of those companies that did not meet their requirements on zero deforestation. “Yes, we can sell our shares, and they care or they don’t care,” he said. “But [alternatively] you can be persistent, you can request public disclosure and public policies, in certain countries you can file shareholder proposals, you can vote against the board, you can vote against their pay package and you can let them know what you are going to do.”The U.S.-based NGO Mighty Earth has campaigned on the issue of soy impacts on the Cerrado and other forested regions of Latin America over many years, and campaign director Anahita Yousefi told Mongabay the group supported this initiative.Corporate responsibilityYousefi warns that while investors appeared to be taking the issue seriously, the companies themselves had largely failed to do so, citing the case of Bunge, one of the largest companies involved in the soy market, which she said had made public commitments on eliminating deforestation but failed to follow these up.Soy field and cerrado / chaco / Amazon transition forest. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.“We felt there was some substance to their engagement on this issue, and we were so disappointed by seeing Bunge not taking it seriously,” Yousefi said.Yousefi also warned that companies investing millions in plantations in the “frontier” regions of the Cerrado and the Gran Chaco are risking the future of their businesses because the loss of natural vegetation could impact rainfall.“We don’t know the tipping point of these ecosystems,” she said. “There have been severe droughts in the Cerrado in the past three or four years, and if you continue this over 10 years, they will become agriculturally stranded assets.”Bunge was among five trading houses fined a total $29 million last year for purchasing soy grown in areas that had been put off-limits by Brazil’s environmental protection agency, Ibama, to allow native vegetation to regrow.In a written statement, Bunge told Mongabay it was working with both the Soft Commodities Forum and the Cerrado Working Group to address deforestation in the region. “We have board oversight, a supply chain specific commitment, and a timebound goal for achieving deforestation-free supply, and we publish data on our traceability and monitoring activities,” said Steward Lindsay, vice president for sustainability and government affairs.Forest in the transition zone between chaco and cerrado biomes being cleared for soybeans. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.The initiative was also welcomed by Washington, D.C.-based consultancy Climate Advisers, which recommended this sort of action to investors in a report published at the end of last year, not just because of increased carbon emissions resulting from deforestation but also because of the impact on companies’ profits.“These risks are not limited to soy,” warned senior analyst Matt Piotrowski. “They extend to all commodities linked to deforestation, such as palm oil, cattle, timber, rubber and cacao, and we need to see more investors setting clear expectations for these industries as well.”Banner image: The Brazilian government’s revamped Terra Legal program could open the way for cattlemen and soy growers to make major land gains across the Amazon and Cerrado. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.About the reporter: James Fair is a wildlife conservation and environmental journalist based in England. You can find him on Twitter at @Jamesfairwild. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this article. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Editor’s Note: A previous version of this article identified BNP Paribas Asset Management as a bank called BNP Paribas. Mongabay regrets the error. last_img read more

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